Kat Cho

#OwnYourOwn: How I found my #OwnVoice

This week is the start of #OwnYourOwn started by the lovely Kaye (@GildedSpine).

YA Interrobang wrote a wonderful intro article about it HERE. I’ll just blurb part of it to explain the gist of it:

We are going to #OwnYourOwn, with advice, with encouragement, with anecdotes so that you can know just how long we’ve been where you are, and how eagerly we’re waiting for you to take our hands and step forward to where we are.

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Adventures in Revising(5): Dialogue

Dialogue is a funny thing. It is the voice of your characters, but it is not necessarily always the voice of your narrative (especially when you’re writing in third person). This means that not only do you have to figure out how to give your story a voice, but also each individual character (wow, writing is hard y’all).

Anyway, here are a few tips that I’ve picked up as I’ve been writing and revising.

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How I got my agent: A tale of writing, woe, and wishing

I present to you my story of how I got my agent
(Warning: This post is LONG and full of GIFs):

I started my professional writing journey when I had a weird dream (yea, I know, one of those people). I told my cousin about it because she’s a writer and I said, “Do you think that could be a book you would write?”

She said,

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Adventures in Revising(4): Revising Scenes/Getting rid of unnecessary Scenes

Next up in Adventures in Revising…Deleting WHOLE scenes.These are my lessons in mapping out my story (this can happen either before or after you start writing, I happen to do it after because I am a pantser, so I use it as a revision tool).

When I map I use visual aids, either a pin-board with little index cards, or a visual file with all of my plot points:

Mapping out your story

(A fun editing software could help with this.

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Adventures in Revising(3): Writing Software | Ulysses III versus Scrivener

So, I don’t know about you guys, but when I decided to write in earnest I just opened a Word Document and let myself go. When I felt like being “fancy”, I used Google Drive so I could have my documents “on the go”.

After I got more than 50 pages written, I would have issues finding sections if I wanted to add new scenes. So, I started trying to create things: like writing notes to myself in the document.

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Adventures in Revising(2): CPs, Beta Readers, or hired editors?

I was reading Miss Snark’s First Victim and Authoress had a really great point about hiring an editor for revisions.

To paraphrase she pretty much says that you shouldn’t hire her for her professional critiquing services if your work has never had eyes on it (i.e. a CP or Beta Reader). For one thing, those people read your work for free, for another, they catch some of the small stuff (i.e.

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Why I love Query Tracker

If you’re querying or about to query, then you probably know there are a lot of tools out there to help you in the process. For myself, I started out with an excel spreadsheet way too long for its own good.

I also had advice from critique partners and other writers.

But, in my need to be organized, I turned to Query Tracker 

(suggested to me by my lovely critique partner).

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Adventures in Revising(1): Throwaway and Redundant words

 

I have a slightly obsessive personality. So when I get into something I do a lot of research and (over) analyze the heck out of it. So when I first began writing and revising, I went a little editing cuh-razy. However, something good came from it, I had a lot of thoughts about editing habits/revising. So, I decided to chronicle my adventures in revising.

 

(NOTE: a lot of this advice caters specifically to the YA genre.

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